Travel Britain


travel britain
travel britain
travel britain
travel britain
travel britain

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Britain's Islands


You may be surprised at how many fascinating and unspoiled islands there are around Britain. From the golden sands of Jersey to the remote allure of the Shetland Islands, there is always something just a bit magical about stepping off the mainland to explore the outer reaches of the British isles. Here are some of the top offshore spots we've found.

islands of britain

Mersea Island


It is odd that Mersea, Britain's most easterly inhabited island, is not more of a household name, given the reputation of its oysters. Cultivated in these Essex creeks since Roman times, Colchester oysters make their way into the kitchens of everyone from Gordon Ramsay to The Ritz, though they are best eaten fresh here.

Mudflats, bleakly beautiful in a certain light, cling to the island, which sits in the estuary of the Colne and Blackwater rivers. There's a dark blonde beach backed by a strip of pastel huts, good spots to swim and a windsurfing club. More beaches can be found in the Cudmore Grove country park. Each August, more than 200 boats take part in a regatta, which includes watersports in the afternoon, fireworks at night and the Cobmarsh marathon rowing races.

Mersea Island is located in North East Essex between the Blackwater and the Colne Estuaries. It is linked to the mainland by a causeway, known as The Strood, which is covered at very high tides for an hour or 2. It is approximately 5 miles long by 2 miles wide. The main settlements are the town of West Mersea and the village of East Mersea. A regular bus service links West and East Mersea to Colchester via the Strood and Abberton. A ferry runs from East Mersea to Point Clear and Brightlingsea on the other side of the Colne estuary, including a scheduled service in the summer and a dial-on-demand service in the spring and autumn.

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